Mythbusters: Egg-citing news

I have some egg-citing news for you all. Today’s myth buster will be on EGGS!
Chicken or Egg
I’m sure you’ve heard one too many times that you shouldn’t eat too many eggs, especially since egg yolks are high in cholesterol. There was even a nutritionist who told me not to eat more than three eggs a week. (I beg to differ)

Indeed, egg whites are favoured because they are high in protein, and low in calories… often the reason why you see people loading up on egg whites and tossing the yolks. But, I’d like to say that you don’t have to avoid egg yolks like the plague (if you used to).

In fact, egg yolks contain more nutrients than the egg whites!

20140430-peeling-eggs-10
First, let’s address the issue on egg yolks contributing to high cholesterol.

Two studies (here and here) have shown that the effect of egg yolks on cholesterol is very minimal, and that when cholesterol levels are raised, it is “good cholesterol” not the artery-clogging kind. So basically egg yolks don’t raise the risk of heart disease.

One of the studies concludes with this:

For these reasons, dietary recommendations aimed at restricting egg consumption should not be generalized to include all individuals. We need to acknowledge that diverse healthy populations experience no risk in developing coronary heart disease by increasing their intake of cholesterol but, in contrast, they may have multiple beneficial effects by the inclusion of eggs in their regular diet.

And I couldn’t agree more! People who have high cholesterol may have to limit their intakes, but these restrictions should not apply to the entire population.

Not convinced?

Here are some benefits of egg yolks that you’ve been missing out:

Egg-Yolks
1) Egg yolks are high in antioxidants
Antioxidants are known to protect the eye. So by consuming more eggs, you could reduce the risk of macular degeneration and the risk of developing eye cataracts.

Eggs-For-Weight-Loss
2) Egg yolks are high in Vitamins
Each egg yolk contains seven vitamins: B6, folate, a B vitamin, B-12, A, D, E and K. Of those, fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E and K are found only in egg yolks and not in egg whites.

Egg yolks are one of only a handful of foods in which vitamin D is naturally found.

Furthermore, egg yolks contain all the carotenoids, lutein and zeaxanthin found in an egg. They also contain more than 90% of the calcium, iron, phosphorus, zinc, thiamin, folate, vitamin B6 and vitamin B12.

heart-shaped-eggs-in-toast

3) Egg yolks contain heart-healthy Omega-3 fats
If you only eat the egg whites, you’re missing out on a lot of heart-healthy omega 3s! When you eat the yolk, you get a good balance of healthy fats, which helps in the absorption of the fat-soluble vitamins. Without fats, ingesting these vitamins wouldn’t even be of much use.

I hope that’s enough to encourage you to go ahead and eat the whole egg! Eating only the egg white would mean you cut calories, but you’ll be ย missing out on a whole lot of nutrients as well.

Once, again another myth is BUSTED.
myth_debunked

Maybe the saying should go.. “An egg yolk a day, keeps the doctor away” instead. Haha. ๐Ÿ˜€ So, don’t worry, go enjoy eggs done your favourite way!

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Balance is key
Another thing is, don’t spam egg yolks (or egg whites) alone. I think God created them together for a reason. So just enjoy the whole egg as it is. 1-2 eggs a day is good for you! I think eggs are one of the healthiest and tastiest foods out there. I love how they can be prepared in so many ways from good old fried eggs, to hard/-soft-boiled to poached and even ramen-style (my favourite!). They make a handy snack too ๐Ÿ™‚

I hope you found this to be an egg-celent post. ๐Ÿ˜›

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