GOBI March: 7 days, 250km… on foot

As much as I would like to say that I’m the one going on this crazy journey on foot, all the credit has to go to my friends, Alexis (aka Manlin) and John. 
These two adventurous spirits are about to embark on a physically and mentally draining race in the Gobi Desert. Most of us can barely run 10km, let alone 250km!

I really admire these two for their determination and courage in choosing to take part in this race, and for their decision to raise funds for the Riding for Disabled Association (RDA) by taking part in the Gobi March.

IMG_9735
Meet Team HorsebackGobi!

Team Horsebackgobi consists of 2 individuals, Alexis Lee Man Lin (age 19) and John Low Zhong Heng (age 22), from the National University of Singapore (NUS).

Alexis is a Year 1 Undergraduate BBA student while John is a Year 1 Undergraduate Life Science student. We are both residents of Tembusu College, a residential college in the NUS campus. Our College Rector, Professor Tommy Koh, Ambassador-at-Large at Singapore’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs, laid down his vision for the college: Bringing the World to Tembusu, and Tembusu to the World. As such, it is here where we first got the idea of taking on this challenge, and subsequently, garnered the support and encouragement of professors and friends to formalise our plans.


You may be wondering what exactly the Gobi March is, so here’s more information:

The Gobi March (China) is part of the 4 Deserts Race Series. The 4 Deserts Race series is a series of unique, rough-country footraces that take place over 7 days and some 250 kilometres in remote and culturally rich locations around the world. Competitors must carry all their own equipment and food and are only provided with water for drinking, tents for sleeping, and access to professional medical and operations teams for support. The series is international; races typically involve competitors from more than 40 countries. Other races in the 4 Deserts Race Series include the Sahara Race (Egypt/Jordan), the Atacama Crossing (Chile) and The Last Desert (Antarctica).

The course for Gobi March 2015 is set to take competitors over 250km kilometres of terrain in the eastern Xinjiang Province of China. The area is known for the colourful culture of its ethnic minorities and beautiful green pastures sheltered by the mighty Tianshan Mountains. This year, it is held from 31 May to 6 June. Participants are required to cover approximately the distance of a marathon each day, except for the “Long March” in Stage 5 of about two marathon lengths. To find out more about Gobi March 2015 and the race details, please visit http://4deserts.com/gobimarch/

IMG_9694

Here’s a little hello from Alexis:

In 1 week, I will be bringing my love for sports and adventuring forwards into raising funds for the Riding for Disabled Association (RDA). Together with my friend John, we will be embarking on the Gobi March, a 250 kilometres race in the Gobi Desert. Within a span of 7 days, we will cover approximately the distance of a marathon each day whilst carrying all our own equipment and food.
RDA is a charity that offers free horse-riding therapy sessions to people with disabilities. These sessions are shown to help in improving their gait, coordination and strength, and most definitely, on the emotional level. As an animal lover myself, this is something I believe very strongly in. And through my Gobi March initiative, I hope to help RDA extend its reach.
For me, a 19 year-old female, petite in size yet big on dreams, embarking on the Gobi March will be my toughest endeavour yet. If you could donate to my cause at http://tinyurl.com/horsebackgobi your support will give me the strength and tenacity to surmount this challenge, and to garner the much-needed support to enrich the lives of the people with disabilities. Any bit of contribution, no matter the value, is deeply appreciated. It’s for a cause that means a lot to me and I hope that you can see the value in these therapy sessions too.

IMG_9665

Where YOU come in

Rather than just liking their posts and their Facebook page, why not do a good deed, and support their cause by donating to the RDA at http://tinyurl.com/horsebackgobi

Honestly, any amount will do, because every little bit counts.

Don’t think so much about whether or not to donate. I think that’s something we struggle with nowadays.

My advice?

Don’t think, just do! (If everyone overthinks, we’ll be lacking people like Alexis and John who cast aside any doubts and signed up for a gruelling 250km race to help raise funds for the RDA)

How often is it that you see youths these days taking up such challenges for a social cause? It would mean the world to them if you could support them, and the RDA. You’re killing more than two birds with one stone!

1) Encouraging Alexis and John as they cross the GOBI desert, knowing that they have made an impact.
2) Helping people with disabilities through the power of horse therapy sessions
3) Inspiring youths to take up risks and step out of their comfort zones
4) It’s good for your heart and soul too 😛

Think about it, they are running across the Gobi Desert in the sweltering heat and rough terrain, all you’ve got to do is take out your credit card and key in a couple of numbers from the comfort of your home.

Sounds way easier right?

You can make a difference without running the 250km, Team HorsebackGobi is doing the hard part for you…so it would be awesome if you could donate to their cause and share their inspiring story with the world 🙂

Do it for them, do it for the RDA, do it for the youths of the future.

Like, Share and Donate!

Follow their journey here on their Facebook page

Donate to their cause here at http://tinyurl.com/horsebackgobi
Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s